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This component provides an infrastructure to publish and discover various resources, such as service proxies, HTTP endpoints, data sources…​

These resources are called services. A service is a discoverable functionality. It can be qualified by its type, metadata, and location. So a service can be a database, a service proxy, a HTTP endpoint and any other resource you can imagine as soon as you can describe it, discover it and interact with it. It does not have to be a vert.x entity, but can be anything. Each service is described by a Record.

The service discovery implements the interactions defined in service-oriented computing. And to some extent, also provides the dynamic service-oriented computing interactions. So, applications can react to arrival and departure of services.

A service provider can:

  • publish a service record

  • un-publish a published record

  • update the status of a published service (down, out of service…​)

A service consumer can:

  • lookup services

  • bind to a selected service (it gets a ServiceReference) and use it

  • release the service once the consumer is done with it

  • listen for arrival, departure and modification of services.

Consumer would 1) lookup a service record matching their need, 2) retrieve the ServiceReference that give access to the service, 3) get a service object to access the service, 4) release the service object once done.

The process can be simplified using service type where you can directly retrieve the service object if you know from which type it is (JDBC client, Http client…​).

As stated above, the central piece of information shared by the providers and consumers are records.

Providers and consumers must create their own ServiceDiscovery instance. These instances are collaborating in the background (distributed structure) to keep the set of services in sync.

The service discovery supports bridges to import and export services from / to other discovery technologies.

Using the service discovery

To use the Vert.x service discovery, add the following dependency to the dependencies section of your build descriptor:

  • Maven (in your pom.xml):

<dependency>
<groupId>io.vertx</groupId>
<artifactId>vertx-service-discovery</artifactId>
<version>3.4.1</version>
</dependency>
  • Gradle (in your build.gradle file):

compile 'io.vertx:vertx-service-discovery:3.4.1'

Overall concepts

The discovery mechanism is based on a few concepts explained in this section.

Service records

A service Record is an object that describes a service published by a service provider. It contains a name, some metadata, a location object (describing where is the service). This record is the only object shared by the provider (having published it) and the consumer (retrieve it when doing a lookup).

The metadata and even the location format depend on the service type (see below).

A record is published when the provider is ready to be used, and withdrawn when the service provider is stopping.

Service Provider and publisher

A service provider is an entity providing a service. The publisher is responsible for publishing a record describing the provider. It may be a single entity (a provider publishing itself) or a different entity.

Service Consumer

Service consumers search for services in the service discovery. Each lookup retrieves 0..n Record. From these records, a consumer can retrieve a ServiceReference, representing the binding between the consumer and the provider. This reference allows the consumer to retrieve the service object (to use the service), and release the service.

It is important to release service references to cleanup the objects and update the service usages.

Service object

The service object is the object that gives access to a service. It can come in various forms, such as a proxy, a client, and may even be non-existent for some service types. The nature of the service object depends on the service type.

Notice that because of the polyglot nature of Vert.x, the service object can differ if you retrieve it from Java, Groovy or another language.

Service types

Services are just resources, and there are a lot of different kinds of services. They can be functional services, databases, REST APIs, and so on. The Vert.x service discovery has the concept of service types to handle this heterogeneity. Each type defines:

  • how the service is located (URI, event bus address, IP / DNS…​) - location

  • the nature of the service object (service proxy, HTTP client, message consumer…​) - client

Some service types are implemented and provided by the service discovery component, but you can add your own.

Service events

Every time a service provider is published or withdrawn, an event is fired on the event bus. This event contains the record that has been modified.

In addition, in order to track who is using who, every time a reference is retrieved with getReference or released with release, events are emitted on the event bus to track the service usages.

More details on these events below.

Backend

The service discovery uses a Vert.x distributed data structure to store the records. So, all members of the cluster have access to all the records. This is the default backend implementation. You can implement your own by implementing the ServiceDiscoveryBackend SPI. For instance, we provide an implementation based on Redis.

Notice that the discovery does not require Vert.x clustering. In single-node mode, the structure is local. It can be populated with `ServiceImporter`s.

Creating a service discovery instance

Publishers and consumers must create their own ServiceDiscovery instance to use the discovery infrastructure:

var ServiceDiscovery = require("vertx-service-discovery-js/service_discovery");
// Use default configuration
var discovery = ServiceDiscovery.create(vertx);

// Customize the configuration
discovery = ServiceDiscovery.create(vertx, {
  "announceAddress" : "service-announce",
  "name" : "my-name"
});

// Do something...

discovery.close();

By default, the announce address (the event bus address on which service events are sent is: vertx.discovery .announce. You can also configure a name used for the service usage (see section about service usage).

When you don’t need the service discovery object anymore, don’t forget to close it. It closes the different discovery importers and exporters you have configured and releases the service references.

You should avoid sharing the service discovery instance, so service usage would represent the right "usages".

Publishing services

Once you have a service discovery instance, you can publish services. The process is the following:

  1. create a record for a specific service provider

  2. publish this record

  3. keep the published record that is used to un-publish a service or modify it.

To create records, you can either use the Record class, or use convenient methods from the service types.

var HttpEndpoint = require("vertx-service-discovery-js/http_endpoint");
// Manual record creation
var record = {
  "type" : "eventbus-service-proxy",
  "location" : {
    "endpoint" : "the-service-address"
  },
  "name" : "my-service",
  "metadata" : {
    "some-label" : "some-value"
  }
};

discovery.publish(record, function (ar, ar_err) {
  if (ar_err == null) {
    // publication succeeded
    var publishedRecord = ar;
  } else {
    // publication failed
  }
});

// Record creation from a type
record = HttpEndpoint.createRecord("some-rest-api", "localhost", 8080, "/api");
discovery.publish(record, function (ar, ar_err) {
  if (ar_err == null) {
    // publication succeeded
    var publishedRecord = ar;
  } else {
    // publication failed
  }
});

It is important to keep a reference on the returned records, as this record has been extended by a registration id.

Withdrawing services

To withdraw (un-publish) a record, use:

discovery.unpublish(record.registration, function (ar, ar_err) {
  if (ar_err == null) {
    // Ok
  } else {
    // cannot un-publish the service, may have already been removed, or the record is not published
  }
});

Looking for services

This section explains the low-level process to retrieve services, each service type provide convenient method to aggregates the different steps.

On the consumer side, the first thing to do is to lookup for records. You can search for a single record or all the matching ones. In the first case, the first matching record is returned.

Consumer can pass a filter to select the service. There are two ways to describe the filter:

  1. A function taking a Record as parameter and returning a boolean (it’s a predicate)

  2. This filter is a JSON object. Each entry of the given filter is checked against the record. All entries must exactly match the record. The entry can use the special * value to denote a requirement on the key, but not on the value.

Let’s see an example of a JSON filter:

{ "name" = "a" } => matches records with name set to "a"
{ "color" = "*" } => matches records with "color" set
{ "color" = "red" } => only matches records with "color" set to "red"
{ "color" = "red", "name" = "a"} => only matches records with name set to "a", and color set to "red"

If the JSON filter is not set (null or empty), it accepts all records. When using functions, to accept all records, you must return true regardless the record.

Here are some examples:

// Get any record
discovery.getRecord(function (r) {
  true;
}, function (ar, ar_err) {
  if (ar_err == null) {
    if ((ar !== null && ar !== undefined)) {
      // we have a record
    } else {
      // the lookup succeeded, but no matching service
    }
  } else {
    // lookup failed
  }
});

discovery.getRecord(null, function (ar, ar_err) {
  if (ar_err == null) {
    if ((ar !== null && ar !== undefined)) {
      // we have a record
    } else {
      // the lookup succeeded, but no matching service
    }
  } else {
    // lookup failed
  }
});


// Get a record by name
discovery.getRecord(function (r) {
  r.name == "some-name";
}, function (ar, ar_err) {
  if (ar_err == null) {
    if ((ar !== null && ar !== undefined)) {
      // we have a record
    } else {
      // the lookup succeeded, but no matching service
    }
  } else {
    // lookup failed
  }
});

discovery.getRecord({
  "name" : "some-service"
}, function (ar, ar_err) {
  if (ar_err == null) {
    if ((ar !== null && ar !== undefined)) {
      // we have a record
    } else {
      // the lookup succeeded, but no matching service
    }
  } else {
    // lookup failed
  }
});

// Get all records matching the filter
discovery.getRecords(function (r) {
  "some-value" == r.metadata.some-label;
}, function (ar, ar_err) {
  if (ar_err == null) {
    var results = ar;
    // If the list is not empty, we have matching record
    // Else, the lookup succeeded, but no matching service
  } else {
    // lookup failed
  }
});


discovery.getRecords({
  "some-label" : "some-value"
}, function (ar, ar_err) {
  if (ar_err == null) {
    var results = ar;
    // If the list is not empty, we have matching record
    // Else, the lookup succeeded, but no matching service
  } else {
    // lookup failed
  }
});

You can retrieve a single record or all matching records with getRecords. By default, record lookup does include only records with a status set to UP. This can be overridden:

  • when using JSON filter, just set status to the value you want (or * to accept all status)

  • when using function, set the includeOutOfService parameter to true in getRecords .

Retrieving a service reference

Once you have chosen the Record, you can retrieve a ServiceReference and then the service object:

var HttpClient = require("vertx-js/http_client");
var MessageConsumer = require("vertx-js/message_consumer");
var reference1 = discovery.getReference(record1);
var reference2 = discovery.getReference(record2);

// Then, gets the service object, the returned type depends on the service type:
// For http endpoint:
var client = reference1.getAs(HttpClient.class);
// For message source
var consumer = reference2.getAs(MessageConsumer.class);

// When done with the service
reference1.release();
reference2.release();

Don’t forget to release the reference once done.

The service reference represents a binding with the service provider.

When retrieving a service reference you can pass a JsonObject used to configure the service object. It can contain various data about the service object. Some service types do not need additional configuration, some require configuration (as data sources):

var JDBCClient = require("vertx-jdbc-js/jdbc_client");
var reference = discovery.getReferenceWithConfiguration(record, conf);

// Then, gets the service object, the returned type depends on the service type:
// For http endpoint:
var client = reference.getAs(JDBCClient.class);

// Do something with the client...

// When done with the service
reference.release();

In the previous examples, the code uses getAs. The parameter is the type of object you expect to get. If you are using Java, you can use get. However in the other language you must pass the expected type.

Types of services

A said above, the service discovery has the service type concept to manage the heterogeneity of the different services.

These types are provided by default:

  • HttpEndpoint - for REST API’s, the service object is a HttpClient configured on the host and port (the location is the url).

  • EventBusService - for service proxies, the service object is a proxy. Its type is the proxies interface (the location is the address).

  • MessageSource - for message sources (publisher), the service object is a MessageConsumer (the location is the address).

  • JDBCDataSource - for JDBC data sources, the service object is a JDBCClient (the configuration of the client is computed from the location, metadata and consumer configuration).

  • RedisDataSource - for Redis data sources, the service object is a RedisClient (the configuration of the client is computed from the location, metadata and consumer configuration).

  • MongoDataSource - for Mongo data sources, the service object is a MongoClient (the configuration of the client is computed from the location, metadata and consumer configuration).

This section gives details about service types in general and describes how to use the default service types.

Services with no type

Some records may have no type (ServiceType.UNKNOWN). It is not possible to retrieve a reference for these records, but you can build the connection details from the location and metadata of the Record.

Using these services does not fire service usage events.

HTTP endpoints

A HTTP endpoint represents a REST API or a service accessible using HTTP requests. The HTTP endpoint service objects are HttpClient configured with the host, port and ssl.

Publishing a HTTP endpoint

To publish a HTTP endpoint, you need a Record. You can create the record using HttpEndpoint.createRecord.

The next snippet illustrates hot to create a Record from HttpEndpoint:

var HttpEndpoint = require("vertx-service-discovery-js/http_endpoint");
var record1 = HttpEndpoint.createRecord("some-http-service", "localhost", 8433, "/api");

discovery.publish(record1, function (ar, ar_err) {
  // ...
});

var record2 = HttpEndpoint.createRecord("some-other-name", true, "localhost", 8433, "/api", {
  "some-metadata" : "some value"
});

When you run your service in a container or on the cloud, it may not know its public IP and public port, so the publication must be done by another entity having this info. Generally it’s a bridge.

Consuming a HTTP endpoint

Once a HTTP endpoint is published, a consumer can retrieve it. The service object is a HttpClient with a port and host configured:

var HttpClient = require("vertx-js/http_client");
// Get the record
discovery.getRecord({
  "name" : "some-http-service"
}, function (ar, ar_err) {
  if (ar_err == null && (ar !== null && ar !== undefined)) {
    // Retrieve the service reference
    var reference = discovery.getReference(ar);
    // Retrieve the service object
    var client = reference.getAs(HttpClient.class);

    // You need to path the complete path
    client.getNow("/api/persons", function (response) {

      // ...

      // Dont' forget to release the service
      reference.release();

    });
  }
});

You can also use the HttpEndpoint.getClient method to combine lookup and service retrieval in one call:

var ServiceDiscovery = require("vertx-service-discovery-js/service_discovery");
var HttpEndpoint = require("vertx-service-discovery-js/http_endpoint");
HttpEndpoint.getClient(discovery, {
  "name" : "some-http-service"
}, function (ar, ar_err) {
  if (ar_err == null) {
    var client = ar;

    // You need to path the complete path
    client.getNow("/api/persons", function (response) {

      // ...

      // Dont' forget to release the service
      ServiceDiscovery.releaseServiceObject(discovery, client);

    });
  }
});

In this second version, the service object is released using ServiceDiscovery.releaseServiceObject, so you don’t need to keep the service reference.

Since Vert.x 3.4.0, another client has been provided. This higher-level client, named WebClient tends to be easier to use. You can retrieve a WebClient instances using:

var WebClient = require("vertx-web-client-js/web_client");
// Get the record
discovery.getRecord({
  "name" : "some-http-service"
}, function (ar, ar_err) {
  if (ar_err == null && (ar !== null && ar !== undefined)) {
    // Retrieve the service reference
    var reference = discovery.getReference(ar);
    // Retrieve the service object
    var client = reference.getAs(WebClient.class);

    // You need to path the complete path
    client.get("/api/persons").send(function (response, response_err) {

      // ...

      // Dont' forget to release the service
      reference.release();

    });
  }
});

And, if you prefer the approach using the service type:

var ServiceDiscovery = require("vertx-service-discovery-js/service_discovery");
var HttpEndpoint = require("vertx-service-discovery-js/http_endpoint");
HttpEndpoint.getWebClient(discovery, {
  "name" : "some-http-service"
}, function (ar, ar_err) {
  if (ar_err == null) {
    var client = ar;

    // You need to path the complete path
    client.get("/api/persons").send(function (response, response_err) {

      // ...

      // Dont' forget to release the service
      ServiceDiscovery.releaseServiceObject(discovery, client);

    });
  }
});

Event bus services

Event bus services are service proxies. They implement async-RPC services on top of the event bus. When retrieving a service object from an event bus service, you get a service proxy of the right type. You can access helper methods from EventBusService.

Notice that service proxies (service implementations and service interfaces) are developed in Java.

Publishing an event bus service

To publish an event bus service, you need to create a Record:

var EventBusService = require("vertx-service-discovery-js/event_bus_service");
var record = EventBusService.createRecord("some-eventbus-service", "address", "examples.MyService", {
  "some-metadata" : "some value"
});

discovery.publish(record, function (ar, ar_err) {
  // ...
});

Consuming an event bus service

To consume an event bus service you can either retrieve the record and then get the reference, or use the EventBusService interface that combines the two operations in one call.

However, as the service is searched by (Java) interface, you need to specify the type of client you expect.

var ServiceDiscovery = require("vertx-service-discovery-js/service_discovery");
var EventBusService = require("vertx-service-discovery-js/event_bus_service");
var MyService = require("org-acme-js/MyService");
EventBusService.getServiceProxyWithJsonFilter(discovery,
{ "service.interface" : "org.acme.MyService"},
MyService,
function (ar, ar_err) {
if (ar_err == null) {
var service = ar;

// Dont' forget to release the service
ServiceDiscovery.releaseServiceObject(discovery, service);
}
});

Message source

A message source is a component sending messages on the event bus on a specific address. Message source clients are MessageConsumer.

The location or a message source service is the event bus address on which messages are sent.

Publishing a message source

As for the other service types, publishing a message source is a 2-step process:

  1. create a record, using MessageSource

  2. publish the record

var MessageSource = require("vertx-service-discovery-js/message_source");
var record = MessageSource.createRecord("some-message-source-service", "some-address");

discovery.publish(record, function (ar, ar_err) {
  // ...
});

record = MessageSource.createRecord("some-other-message-source-service", "some-address", "examples.MyData");

In the second record, the type of payload is also indicated. This information is optional.

Consuming a message source

On the consumer side, you can retrieve the record and the reference, or use the MessageSource class to retrieve the service is one call.

With the first approach, the code is the following:

var MessageConsumer = require("vertx-js/message_consumer");
// Get the record
discovery.getRecord({
  "name" : "some-message-source-service"
}, function (ar, ar_err) {
  if (ar_err == null && (ar !== null && ar !== undefined)) {
    // Retrieve the service reference
    var reference = discovery.getReference(ar);
    // Retrieve the service object
    var consumer = reference.getAs(MessageConsumer.class);

    // Attach a message handler on it
    consumer.handler(function (message) {
      // message handler
      var payload = message.body();
    });

    // ...
    // when done
    reference.release();
  }
});

When, using MessageSource, it becomes:

var ServiceDiscovery = require("vertx-service-discovery-js/service_discovery");
var MessageSource = require("vertx-service-discovery-js/message_source");
MessageSource.getConsumer(discovery, {
  "name" : "some-message-source-service"
}, function (ar, ar_err) {
  if (ar_err == null) {
    var consumer = ar;

    // Attach a message handler on it
    consumer.handler(function (message) {
      // message handler
      var payload = message.body();
    });
    // ...

    // Dont' forget to release the service
    ServiceDiscovery.releaseServiceObject(discovery, consumer);

  }
});

JDBC Data source

Data sources represents databases or data stores. JDBC data sources are a specialization for databases accessible using a JDBC driver. The client of a JDBC data source service is a JDBCClient.

Publishing a JDBC service

As for the other service types, publishing a JDBC data source is a 2-step process:

  1. create a record, using JDBCDataSource

  2. publish the record

var JDBCDataSource = require("vertx-service-discovery-js/jdbc_data_source");
var record = JDBCDataSource.createRecord("some-data-source-service", {
  "url" : "some jdbc url"
}, {
  "some-metadata" : "some-value"
});

discovery.publish(record, function (ar, ar_err) {
  // ...
});

As JDBC data sources can represent a high variety of databases, and their access is often different, the record is rather unstructured. The location is a simple JSON object that should provide the fields to access the data source (JDBC url, username…​). The set of fields may depend on the database but also on the connection pool used in front.

Consuming a JDBC service

As stated in the previous section, how to access a data source depends on the data source itself. To build the JDBCClient, you can merge configuration: the record location, the metadata and a json object provided by the consumer:

var JDBCClient = require("vertx-jdbc-js/jdbc_client");
// Get the record
discovery.getRecord({
  "name" : "some-data-source-service"
}, function (ar, ar_err) {
  if (ar_err == null && (ar !== null && ar !== undefined)) {
    // Retrieve the service reference
    var reference = discovery.getReferenceWithConfiguration(ar, {
      "username" : "clement",
      "password" : "*****"
    });

    // Retrieve the service object
    var client = reference.getAs(JDBCClient.class);

    // ...

    // when done
    reference.release();
  }
});

You can also use the JDBCClient class to the lookup and retrieval in one call:

var ServiceDiscovery = require("vertx-service-discovery-js/service_discovery");
var JDBCDataSource = require("vertx-service-discovery-js/jdbc_data_source");
JDBCDataSource.getJDBCClient(discovery, {
  "name" : "some-data-source-service"
}, {
  "username" : "clement",
  "password" : "*****"
}, function (ar, ar_err) {
  if (ar_err == null) {
    var client = ar;

    // ...

    // Dont' forget to release the service
    ServiceDiscovery.releaseServiceObject(discovery, client);

  }
});

Redis Data source

Redis data sources are a specialization for Redis persistence databases. The client of a Redis data source service is a RedisClient.

Publishing a Redis service

Publishing a Redis data source is a 2-step process:

  1. create a record, using RedisDataSource

  2. publish the record

var RedisDataSource = require("vertx-service-discovery-js/redis_data_source");
var record = RedisDataSource.createRecord("some-redis-data-source-service", {
  "url" : "localhost"
}, {
  "some-metadata" : "some-value"
});

discovery.publish(record, function (ar, ar_err) {
  // ...
});

The location is a simple JSON object that should provide the fields to access the Redis data source (url, port…​).

Consuming a Redis service

As stated in the previous section, how to access a data source depends on the data source itself. To build the RedisClient, you can merge configuration: the record location, the metadata and a json object provided by the consumer:

var RedisClient = require("vertx-redis-js/redis_client");
// Get the record
discovery.getRecord({
  "name" : "some-redis-data-source-service"
}, function (ar, ar_err) {
  if (ar_err == null && (ar !== null && ar !== undefined)) {
    // Retrieve the service reference
    var reference = discovery.getReference(ar);

    // Retrieve the service instance
    var client = reference.getAs(RedisClient.class);

    // ...

    // when done
    reference.release();
  }
});

You can also use the RedisDataSource class to the lookup and retrieval in one call:

var ServiceDiscovery = require("vertx-service-discovery-js/service_discovery");
var RedisDataSource = require("vertx-service-discovery-js/redis_data_source");
RedisDataSource.getRedisClient(discovery, {
  "name" : "some-redis-data-source-service"
}, function (ar, ar_err) {
  if (ar_err == null) {
    var client = ar;

    // ...

    // Dont' forget to release the service
    ServiceDiscovery.releaseServiceObject(discovery, client);

  }
});

Mongo Data source

Mongo data sources are a specialization for MongoDB databases. The client of a Mongo data source service is a MongoClient.

Publishing a Mongo service

Publishing a Mongo data source is a 2-step process:

  1. create a record, using MongoDataSource

  2. publish the record

var MongoDataSource = require("vertx-service-discovery-js/mongo_data_source");
var record = MongoDataSource.createRecord("some-data-source-service", {
  "connection_string" : "some mongo connection"
}, {
  "some-metadata" : "some-value"
});

discovery.publish(record, function (ar, ar_err) {
  // ...
});

The location is a simple JSON object that should provide the fields to access the Redis data source (url, port…​).

Consuming a Mongo service

As stated in the previous section, how to access a data source depends on the data source itself. To build the MongoClient, you can merge configuration: the record location, the metadata and a json object provided by the consumer:

// Get the record
discovery.getRecord({
  "name" : "some-data-source-service"
}, function (ar, ar_err) {
  if (ar_err == null && (ar !== null && ar !== undefined)) {
    // Retrieve the service reference
    var reference = discovery.getReferenceWithConfiguration(ar, {
      "username" : "clement",
      "password" : "*****"
    });

    // Retrieve the service object
    var client = reference.get();

    // ...

    // when done
    reference.release();
  }
});

You can also use the MongoDataSource class to the lookup and retrieval in one call:

var ServiceDiscovery = require("vertx-service-discovery-js/service_discovery");
var MongoDataSource = require("vertx-service-discovery-js/mongo_data_source");
MongoDataSource.getMongoClient(discovery, {
  "name" : "some-data-source-service"
}, {
  "username" : "clement",
  "password" : "*****"
}, function (ar, ar_err) {
  if (ar_err == null) {
    var client = ar;

    // ...

    // Dont' forget to release the service
    ServiceDiscovery.releaseServiceObject(discovery, client);

  }
});

Listening for service arrivals and departures

Every time a provider is published or removed, an event is published on the vertx.discovery.announce address. This address is configurable from the ServiceDiscoveryOptions.

The received record has a status field indicating the new state of the record:

  • UP : the service is available, you can start using it

  • DOWN : the service is not available anymore, you should not use it anymore

  • OUT_OF_SERVICE : the service is not running, you should not use it anymore, but it may come back later.

Listening for service usage

Every time a service reference is retrieved (bind) or released (release), an event is published on the vertx .discovery.usage address. This address is configurable from the ServiceDiscoveryOptions.

It lets you listen for service usage and map the service bindings.

The received message is a JsonObject containing:

  • the record in the record field

  • the type of event in the type field. It’s either bind or release

  • the id of the service discovery (either its name or the node id) in the id field

This id is configurable from the ServiceDiscoveryOptions. By default it’s "localhost" on single node configuration and the id of the node in clustered mode.

You can disable the service usage support by setting the usage address to null with usageAddress.

Service discovery bridges

Bridges let you import and export services from / to other discovery mechanism such as Docker, Kubernates, Consul…​ Each bridge decides how the services are imported and exported. It does not have to be bi-directional.

You can provide your own bridge by implementing the ServiceImporter interface and register it using registerServiceImporter.

The second parameter can provide an optional configuration for the bridge.

When the bridge is registered the

{@link io.vertx.servicediscovery.spi.ServiceImporter#start)} method is called. It lets you configure the bridge. When the bridge is configured, ready and has imported / exported the initial services, it must complete the given Future. If the bridge starts method is blocking, it must use an executeBlocking construct, and complete the given future object.

When the service discovery is stopped, the bridge is stopped. The close method is called that provides the opportunity to cleanup resources, removed imported / exported services…​ This method must complete the given Future to notify the caller of the completion.

Notice than in a cluster, only one member needs to register the bridge as the records are accessible by all members.

Additional bridges

In addition of the bridges supported by this library, Vert.x Service Discovery provides additional bridges you can use in your application.

Consul bridge

This discovery bridge imports services from Consul into the Vert.x service discovery.

The bridge connects to a Consul agent (server) and periodically scan for services:

  • new services are imported

  • services in maintenance mode or that has been removed from consul are removed

This bridge uses the HTTP API for Consul. It does not export to Consul and does not support service modification.

The service type is deduced from tags. If a tag matches a known service type, this service type will be used. If not, the service is imported as unknown. Only http-endpoint is supported for now.

Using the bridge

To use this Vert.x discovery bridge, add the following dependency to the dependencies section of your build descriptor:

  • Maven (in your pom.xml):

<dependency>
  <groupId>io.vertx</groupId>
  <artifactId>vertx-service-discovery-bridge-consul</artifactId>
  <version>3.4.1</version>
</dependency>
  • Gradle (in your build.gradle file):

compile 'io.vertx:vertx-service-discovery-bridge-consul:3.4.1'

Then, when creating the service discovery registers this bridge as follows:

var ServiceDiscovery = require("vertx-service-discovery-js/service_discovery");
ServiceDiscovery.create(vertx).registerServiceImporter(new (Java.type("io.vertx.servicediscovery.consul.ConsulServiceImporter"))(), {
  "host" : "localhost",
  "port" : 8500,
  "scan-period" : 2000
});

You can configure the:

  • agent host using the host property, it defaults to localhost

  • agent port using the port property, it defaults to 8500

  • scan period using the scan-period property. The time is set in ms, and is 2000 ms by default

Kubernetes bridge

This discovery bridge imports services from Kubernetes (or Openshift v3) into the Vert.x service discovery.

Kubernetes services are mapped to Record. This bridge only supports the importation of services from kubernetes in vert.x (and not the opposite).

Record are created from Kubernetes Service. The service type is deduced from the service.type label. If not set, the service is imported as unknown. Only http-endpoint are supported for now.

Using the bridge

To use this Vert.x discovery bridge, add the following dependency to the dependencies section of your build descriptor:

  • Maven (in your pom.xml):

<dependency>
  <groupId>io.vertx</groupId>
  <artifactId>vertx-service-discovery-bridge-kubernetes</artifactId>
  <version>3.4.1</version>
</dependency>
  • Gradle (in your build.gradle file):

compile 'io.vertx:vertx-service-discovery-bridge-kubernetes:3.4.1'

Configuring the bridge

The bridge is configured using:

  • the oauth token (using the content of /var/run/secrets/kubernetes.io/serviceaccount/token by default)

  • the namespace in which the service are searched (defaults to default).

Be aware that the application must have access to Kubernetes and must be able to read the chosen namespace.

The Service to Record mapping

The record is created as follows:

  • the service type is deduced from the service.type label. If this label is not set the service type is set to unknown

  • the record’s name is the service’s name

  • the labels of the service are mapped to metadata

  • in addition are added: kubernetes.uuid, kubernetes.namespace, kubernetes.name

  • the location is deduced from the first port of the service

For HTTP endpoints, the ssl (https) attribute is set to true if the service has the ssl label set to true.

Dynamics

The bridge imports all services on start and removes them on stop. In between it watches the Kubernetes services and add the new ones and removes the deleted ones.

Unresolved directive in index.adoc - include::zookeeper-bridge.adoc[]

This discovery bridge imports services from Docker Links into the Vert.x service discovery.

When you link a Docker container to another Docker container, Docker injects a set of environment variables. This bridge analyzes these environment variables and imports service record for each link. The service type is deduced from the service.type label. If not set, the service is imported as unknown. Only http-endpoint are supported for now.

As the links are created when the container starts, the imported records are created when the bridge starts and do not change afterwards.

Using the bridge

To use this Vert.x discovery bridge, add the following dependency to the dependencies section of your build descriptor:

  • Maven (in your pom.xml):

<dependency>
  <groupId>io.vertx</groupId>
  <artifactId>vertx-service-discovery-bridge-docker-links</artifactId>
  <version>3.4.1</version>
</dependency>
  • Gradle (in your build.gradle file):

compile 'io.vertx:vertx-service-discovery-bridge-docker-links:3.4.1'

Then, when creating the service discovery, registers this bridge as follows:

var ServiceDiscovery = require("vertx-service-discovery-js/service_discovery");
ServiceDiscovery.create(vertx).registerServiceImporter(new (Java.type("io.vertx.servicediscovery.docker.DockerLinksServiceImporter"))(), {
});

The bridge does not need any further configuration.

Additional backends

In addition of the backend supported by this library, Vert.x Service Discovery provides additional backends you can use in your application.

Redis backend

The service discovery has a plug-able backend using the ServiceDiscoveryBackend SPI.

This is an implementation of the SPI based on Redis.

Using the Redis backend

To use the Redis backend, add the following dependency to the dependencies section of your build descriptor:

  • Maven (in your pom.xml):

<dependency>
  <groupId>io.vertx</groupId>
  <artifactId>vertx-service-discovery-backend-redis</artifactId>
  <version>3.4.1</version>
</dependency>
  • Gradle (in your build.gradle file):

compile 'io.vertx:vertx-service-discovery-backend-redis:3.4.1'

Be aware that you can have only a single implementation of the SPI in your classpath. If none, the default backend is used.

Configuration

The backend is based on the vertx-redis-client. The configuration is the client configuration as well as key indicating in which key on Redis the records are stored.

Here is an example:

var ServiceDiscovery = require("vertx-service-discovery-js/service_discovery");
ServiceDiscovery.create(vertx, {
  "backendConfiguration" : {
    "host" : "127.0.0.1",
    "key" : "records"
  }
});